Tuesday, July 16 2019, 04:17:56
logo
  • fatasstic

Apeksha Bagchi

IWB Blogger

Tribal Women Across India Share Their Expectations And Disappointments From The Ongoing Lok Sabha Elections

  • IWB Post
  •  May 15, 2019

As the 2019 Lok Sabha Elections are underway, many are expressing what they desire from the political party that comes in power next. But what about the opinions and expectations of those living in the remote areas of India, the tribal communities and regions?

Hindustan Times recently interviewed women from different tribal regions across India to know what they think of elections, the role of governments, their expectations and requirements from the future government. Some of them are disappointed, some hopeful, some still trapped in the patriarchal set-up of society that relegates women to secondary roles.

Among Kleng, 62

india-tribal-women-vote-photo-gallery_28b267ea-7581-11e9-b041-b8edd22396b2

She is a Karbi tribal woman living near Guwahati and said that though no elected leaders listen to their problems, she is still hopeful and thus cast her vote.

Nirmala Devi, 45

Tribal Women

A Gaddi tribal woman, Nirmala Devi, who owns a  barley field in her village in Naddi, near Dharamsala, has little expectations of the upcoming government as in her experiences they rarely keep their promises.

Padumi Miri, 32

Tribal Women

Padumi is a Mishing tribal woman living in the river island of Majuli, in Assam. Considering voting in elections as a chore which she has to do every five years, Miri has never seen a political leader in her life nor does she have any idea why she votes.

Tungshang Ningreichon

Tribal Women

Living in New Delhi, Ningreichon is an indigenous Naga tribal woman and activist. She believes that elections affect “every part of our lives. The leaders that we choose would greatly impact how we put the idea of peace, justice, and democracy into practice.”  

Lisia Ingtii, 50

Tribal Women

Lisia is a Karbi tribal woman living near Guwahati and does not believe that her exercising her right to vote will bring about any revolution as even the basic rights of the people in her village are missing- no school teachers and no road connectivity.

Kinya Bagra, 33

Tribal Women

Kinya, living in Along, Arunachal Pradesh, is an Adi tribal woman and has voted in the hopes that the new elected leader will work for the development of her village.

Kargep Yao, 36

Tribal Women

Another Adi tribal woman from Along, Yao will cast her vote in hopes of a better future, development, and security for women.

Lona Syngkli

Tribal Women

Lona Syngkli shared that she basically cast her vote just because her husband told her to.

H/T: Hindustan Times

 

 

 

Contact us for your story


adv-1

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • JWB along with the brand Jewel Saga bring you a selfie contest inspired by the campaign AidToMaid.

need help

X